A photo report · Global Voices

Prague Pride Parade in Prague’s Old Town Square on August 13, 2022. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

After a two-year hiatus, the Prague Pride Parade returned to the streets on August 13, attracting about 60,000 people.

Established for the first time in 2011the Prague Pride Parade, the second largest in Central Europe after Warsaw, was halted in 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, when it was symbolically transported a few boats on the Prague river, the Vltava.

While the Czech Republic has a relatively decent track record for LGBTQ+ rights in central Europe, it still refuses to offer marriage equality to its citizens. The issue has been on the political agenda for a few years and will no doubt resurface before the country’s election. January 2023 Presidential elections. The current president Miloš Zeman did not hide his opposition to the proposed law guaranteeing equal marriage rights for all. For such a law to be passed, it must first be approved by the Senate and then signed by the President.

Unlike Zeman, the current coalition government, in particular its Pirate Party, is in favor of equal marriage. One of its most vocal supporters is Prague Major Zdeněk Hřib, who took part in the march on August 13 as an ally of the LGBTQ+ community.

Another theme running through this year’s parade is Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which prompted organizers to move Pride Parade from Kyiv to Warsaw this year for security reasons. Attendees were also abuzz about Ukraine’s president Announcement by Volodymyr Zelensky on August 2 that he supports same-sex partnership legislation for Ukrainians.

Here are some photos from Prague Pride on August 14, 2022 illustrating some of these themes and the diversity of the LGBTQ+ community in Prague.

Ukrainian, along with Russian, is one of the many languages ​​heard during the Prague Pride Parade, while solidarity with Ukraine is visible at the event. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

“Zelensky allowed to fuck” reads this poster following the announcement that the Ukrainian government may legalize same-sex unions. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

Russia's action in Ukraine is part of the parade's narrative.  Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

Russia’s action in Ukraine is part of the parade’s narrative. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

The free Belarusian flag is also part of the parade. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

The LGBTQI+ community is present in all its diversity. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

The LGBTQI+ community is present in all its diversity, here with a giant rainbow flag in Prague’s central Wenceslas Square. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

The LGBTQI+ community is present in all its diversity. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

The LGBTI+ community is present in all its diversity. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

The LGBTQ+ community is present in all its diversity. Photo by Filip Noubel, used with permission.

Berta D. Wells